Henley on Thames by car

returned by car this visit

Friday 1st September and I partook of an early morning swim on my own this time. Charlie has been having trouble with his right hip giving him discomfort, so he decided not to go as we would be going back to Henley, and probably doing alot of walking. Carol and Steve picked us up around 10am and off we went. It had taken us the equivalent of 4 days to get from Henley to Wallingford by boat, but by car only 20mins. Once parked we headed for the tourist information and purchased a town walk leaflet. Steve did a grand job of narrating the route, whilst I took the photo’s. Here follows the photo’s of the day.

the town hall. A victorian building designed by Henry T Hare to commemorate Queen Victoria’s jubilee in 1901.

Friar park. A 120 roomed mansion built in 1899 as a weekend retreat for Sir Frank Crisp, an eccentric London solicitor. It was also the home of George Harrison the former Beatle.. This part is only the gatehouse.

The Rowbarge. This was once the site for destitute agricultural workers and their starving families. Opposite were the workhouse gates where tramps used to gather hoping to be admitted and given a meal and an overnight stay. It wasn’t until the 1850’s when public sewers and running water was installed that conditions started to improve. The Rowbarge pub signshows Princess Anne being taken up the regatta course in 1977 in a replica of a royal barge that was built for the film “A man for all seasons”.

Kings Arms barn opposite the Town Hall and dated by it’s timbers to 1602

there has been a market in Henley since the 13th century, it would have sold grain and items brought up the river from London. The current market has been held here since 2000 when the road was pedestrianised. Today it was hosting a French market.

This public house is the oldest known surviving house in Henley, tree ring dated to 1325.

The Bull Inn is one of the oldest inn’s in Henley. It is supposedly haunted by the ghost of a young lady and the smell of tallow candles

Barnaby cottages were built as 2 houses between 1450 and 1500.

Anne Boleyn cottage shows many blocked keyholes on its door which testify to the age and value placed on locks. It was common practice in those times to take locks and keys when owners moved!

The Kenton theatre was built in 1804 on the site of the workhouse and is the country’s fourth oldest purpose built working theatre

Brakspear brewery building, the company once owned 150 pubs and supplied beer to many more

the old malthouse and stables of the brewery now apartments

the old stables

River Thames in front of the Leander club, founded in 1818 and the home of British rowing

a sign on Henley Bridge. The current Henley Bridge took four years to build and was completed in April 1786

The Red Lion Hotel has been a major coaching inn since the 1600’s and has had m,any famous guests including Oliver Cromwell and King George IV

St Mary’s church. 12th century in origin but rebuilt in the 1500’s with further alterations in the 1840’s. In the churchyard there is a memorial to Dusty Springfield. Some of her ashes were placed here as she lived in the town toward the end of her life

where we parked the car

Our day over we went back to Wallingford and had a walk around the Bunkfest stalls, partaking of a takeaway in the evening. Many more photo’s to follow of the Bunkfest in the next instalment.

 

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